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Awards

Awards

  1. Army Service Ribbon, ASR

    History


    Established by the Secretary of the Army on 10 April 1981, the Army Service Ribbon is awarded to members of the Army, Army Reserve, and Army National Guard for successful completion of initial-entry training, which for officers is considered to be successful completion of their basic/orientation or higher level course.

    Prerequisites


    The Army Service Ribbon shall be awarded to all personnel after the completion of RASP Phase 1

  2. Overseas Service Ribbon, OSR

    History


    The Army Overseas Service Ribbon was first issued in August 1981. It is presented to any member of the United States Army who completes a standard overseas tour of duty. In the 11 December 2006 revision of AR 600-8-22 (Military Awards), the Army eliminated the policy which had restricted the awarding of the Overseas Service Ribbon when another campaign or service medal is awarded.

    Prerequisites


    The Overseas service ribbon shall be awarded to soldiers who participate in 5 Official Operations 3rd Ranger Battalion.

  3. Recruiting Service Ribbon, RSR

    Prerequisites


    3rd Ranger Battalion Recruitment Ribbon. Shall be awarded for every 3 members recruited into the unit that finishes RASP.

  4. Non-Commissioned Officer Professional Development Ribbon, NCOPDR

    Description


    The NCO Professional Development Ribbon (established in 1981) is issued by the U.S. Army for completion of any prescribed noncommissioned officer development courses. Completion of a leadership course as prescribed by the training units of the 3RB.

    1st Award: Complete Advanced Leadership Course

    2nd Award: Complete Non-Commissioned Officer Academy

  5. Military Outstanding Volunteer Service Medal, MOVSM

    History


    The Military Outstanding Volunteer Service Medal (MOVSM) was established by Executive Order 12830, 9 January 1993. It may be awarded to members of the Armed Forces of the United States and their Reserve Components, who subsequent to 31 December 1992, perform outstanding volunteer community service of a sustained direct and consequential nature.

    Prerequisites


    Non existent

  6. Humanitarian Service Medal, HSM

    History


    The Humanitarian Service Medal was established by President Ford per Executive Order 11965, dated 19 January 1977. The order provided for award for participation in a military operation of a humanitarian nature subsequent to 1 April 1975. The policy and award criteria for the Humanitarian Service Medal was established by Department of Defense Directive 1348.25, dated 23 June 1977. Proposed medals were submitted to the Office of the Secretary of Defense (OSD) for approval 18 April 1977 and the selected design was approved by OSD on 10 May 1977. The design by Mr. Jay Morris, The Institute of Heraldry, uses the outstretched hand with palm up as the international symbol for aid and assistance. On the reverse, the oak sprig is symbolic of strength imparted through a selfless mission to aid mankind. The color purple in the ribbon stands for self-sacrifice, white for regeneration and blue for universal friendship. In addition, the two shades of blue are the colors used in the flags of OSD.

    Prerequisites


    The Humanitarian Service Medal shall be awarded to members of the 3rd Battalion, 75th Ranger Regiment  who distinguish themselves by meritorious direct participation in any significant online act or operation of a humanitarian nature approved by Command Staff. The medal is awarded for participation in areas of helping others with technical issues (such as web design, graphics, signatures and general computer problems) or morale support to fellow members in times of need.

  7. Global War on Terrorism Service Medal, GWOTSM

    History


    On 20 September 2002, the Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense, requested the Institute provide suggested designs. This was accomplished and the design was selected on 7 January 2003. Executive Order 13289, dated 12 March 2003, signed by President Bush, established this medal.

    Prerequisites


    The Global War on Terrorism Service Medal shall be awarded to any soldier who has been deployed to fight terrorism. While being deployed, the soldier must complete his/her duties to the best of their abilities in no less than three official operations.

  8. Armed Forced Expeditionary Medals, AFEM

    History


    During the late 1950's, it became apparent that a medal was needed to recognize the services of the Armed Forces who participated in the increased involvement of the American military in peacekeeping activities. As a result, President Kennedy established the Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal, per Executive Order 10977, dated 4 December 1961, for operations on or after 1 July 1958. In a memorandum dated 20 December 1961, the Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense requested that The Institute of Heraldry submit proposed designs as soon as possible. Proposed designs were submitted on 25 January 1962 and a design, created by Mr. Jay Morris, was tentatively selected. The design was submitted to the Commission of Fine Arts for comments prior to approval by the Deputy Secretary of Defense on 24 April 1962. The selected design uses the eagle to represent the strength of our Armed Forces, and the sword, loose in its scabbard, denotes the readiness to serve wherever needed, as further suggested by the compass rose. At the present time, JCS has designated 22 operations for which the Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal may be awarded. A bronze service star is worn to denote second and subsequent awards of the Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal. Each Service may authorize the use of campaign streamers for operations in the designated areas. The Army has authorized campaign credit and display of streamers for three areas: Grenada, Panama and the Dominican Republic. The Air Force has authorized display of streamers for all 22 operations. The Navy authorizes display of three silver stars and four bronze stars on the streamer representing 19 operations.

    Prerequisites


    The Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal shall be awarded to soldiers who have reached 12 Months Time in Service and participated in no less than 8 combat operations.

  9. Good Conduct Medal, GCM

    History


    The Good Conduct Medal was established by Executive Order 8809, dated 28 June 1941, and authorized the award for soldiers completing three years active service after that date. The criteria was amended by Executive Order 9323, dated 31 March 1943, to authorize award for three years service after 7 December 1941 or one year service while the United States is at war. Executive Order 10444, dated 10 April 1953, revised the criteria to authorize award for three years service after 27 August 1940; one year service after 7 December 1941 while the United States is at war; and award for the first award for service after 27 June 1950 upon termination of service, for periods less than three years, but more than one year. The medal was designed by Mr. Joseph Kiselewski and approved by the Secretary of War on 30 October 1942. The eagle, with wings spread, denotes vigilance and superiority. The horizontal sword denotes loyalty, and the book represents knowledge acquired and ability gained. On the reverse, the lone star denotes merit. The wreath of laurel and oak leaves denotes reward and strength. The second and subsequent awards are indicated by the wear of the clasp with loop on the ribbon. Bronze clasps indicate the second (two loops) through fifth award (five loops); silver clasps indicate sixth (one loop) through tenth award (five loops); and gold clasps indicate eleventh (one loop) through the fifteenth award (5 loops).

    Prerequisites


    The Good Conduct Medal shall be awarded for reaching 6 Months Time in Service with the 3rd Battalion, 75th Ranger Regiment without any significant punitive disciplinary actions.

  10. Army Achievement Medal, AAM

    History


    As part of the Army Cohesion and Stability Study (ARCOST) of 1980, a recommendation was made to establish the Army Achievement Medal, Overseas Service Ribbon, Army Service Ribbon, and the NCO Professional Development Ribbon. On 18 February 1981, MILPERCEN requested TIOH initiate action to develop the recommended awards. Designs were prepared by TIOH and forwarded to MILPERCEN on 18 March 1981. On 10 April 1981, the Secretary of the Army approved establishment of the decorations recommended by the ARCOST group. On 13 April 1981, the DCSPER approved a design which had been submitted by TIOH and directed development be initiated.

    Prerequisites


    The Army Achievement Medal is issued to unit members who have contributed to the 3rd Battalion, 75th Ranger Regiment and gone above and beyond what is required of them to improve this unit. This award cannot be issued for valor.

  11. Army Commendation Medal, ACM

    History


    In a summary sheet, 5 November 1945, WDGAP, Personnel Division recommended that an Army Commendation Ribbon of distinctive design be established to recognize meritorious service in an area at a time for which the Bronze Star Medal may not be awarded. The recommendation was approved by the Secretary of War and the ribbon was established by War Department Circular 377, dated 18 December 1945. This circular authorized award to 'members of the Armed Forces of the United States serving in any capacity with the Army for meritorious service rendered since 7 December 1941, not in sustained operational activities against an enemy nor in direct support of such operation, i.e., in areas and at times when the Bronze Star Medal may not be awarded because of its operational character'. Authority to award the Commendation Ribbon was delegated to Major Generals or commanders of any command, force or installation normally commanded by Major Generals.

    Prerequisites


    The Army Commendation Medal shall be awarded to soldiers for outstanding performance or achievement in a combat leadership role over a period of time. Can be awarded for achievement in action in a competitive match below that required for a Bronze Star. In case of a combat award, the V device shall be attached.

  12. Meritorious Service Medal, MSM

    History


    At Tri-Department Awards Conference, 5-6 February 1968, there was a discussion on the need for a third meritorious award to provide appropriate recognition for noncombat achievement or service comparable to the Bronze Star Medal for combat achievement or service. It was felt that the Legion of Merit’s prestige was slipping because it was being used with increasing frequency to reward service below Legion of Merit standard, but higher than that required for the Commendation Medal. A proposed executive order was prepared in April 1968 and forwarded for approval to the Military Departments. An ad hoc committee was formed by the Secretary of Defense to select a name. On 8 November 1968, the committee unanimously approved the name 'Meritorious Service Medal'. President Johnson established the Meritorious Service Medal per Executive Order No. 11448 dated 16 January 1969. The Executive Order was amended by President Reagan per Executive Order 12312, dated 2 July 1981, to authorize award to members of the armed forces of friendly foreign nations. The decoration was designed by Mr. Jay Morris, The Institute of Heraldry, and the design was approved by the committee on 20 March 1969. The ribbon design purposely follows the colors used for the Legion of Merit to reflect the parallel between the two medals. The eagle, symbol of the nation, stands on laurel branches denoting achievement. The star is used to represent the military service and the rays emanating therefrom denote the constant efforts of individuals to achieve through excellent and meritorious service.

    Prerequisites


    The Meritorious Service Medal shall be awarded for NCO's or Officers with no less than 1 Year Time in Service, where during their service have recieved a minimum of one other non-valor award and served without any punitive disciplinary strike.

  13. Air Medal AM

    History
    The Air Medal is awarded to anyone who distinguishes himself or herself by meritorious achievement while participating in aerial flight.
    Prerequisites

    Awarded for performing outstanding flight-related duties while in a combat zone. Must be assigned an MOS such as Detachment Commander, Pilot, or Crew (W1-W5). May be awarded with a Combat "V" for Valor for an act of meritorious action or bravery against an armed enemy less than the criteria for the Distinguished Flying Cross. 

  14. Valorous Unit Award, VUA

    History


    As a result of a request from the Commander, USMACV, to expand the scope of the Meritorious Unit Commendation to include acts of valor, a review of the unit awards program was conducted in 1965. The study concluded that a gap existed in the awards program. The Distinguished Unit Citation was awarded for gallantry in action for heroism that would warrant the Distinguished Service Cross to an individual. There was no lesser unit award for heroism. Based on the study, a recommendation was submitted to expand the scope of the Meritorious Unit Commendation to include acts of heroism. The recommendation was disapproved by the DCSPER and in a memorandum to the CSA, dated 7 January 1966, the DCSPER recommended a Valorous Unit Award be adopted to signify unit gallantry in combat to a degree equivalent to that required for award of a Silver Star to an individual. The recommendation with proposed design was approved by the Chief of Staff, Army, on 12 January 1966.

    Prerequisites


    The Valorous Unit Award is the second highest unit decoration which may be bestowed upon a U.S. Army unit. The Valorous Unit Award shall be awarded to any unit of the 3rd Special Forces Groupwhich displays extraordinary heroism in action against an armed enemy of the United States of America by order of the commander.

  15. Joint Service Commendation Medal, JSCM

    History


    The last Commendation Medal to be created (in 1963) is the Joint Service Commendation Medal. This award is intended for service in joint military organizations and is senior in precedence to the service-specific Commendation Medals.
    Prerequisites


    Participate in a combined joint operation or a joint combined exchange training with another unit.

  16. Army Superior Unit Award, ASUA

    History


    As part of the Army Cohesion and Stability Study (ARCOST) of 1980, a proposal to adopt the Army Superior Unit Award was forwarded to Major Army Commands (MACOM) for comment on 18 March 1981. This recommendation was based on the fact that present Army unit awards were for combat service only. While all MACOM and most of the Army Staff supported the proposal, the leadership elected not to approve the new award. In 1984, the Vice Chief of Staff, Army, directed that a Peacetime Unit Award be developed and submitted for approval. In April 1985, the Secretary of the Army (SECARMY) approved the Army Superior Unit Award for meritorious unit performance of a uniquely difficult and challenging mission under extraordinary circumstances that involved the national interest. As a result of the strict criteria and lack of approving awards, the criteria was changed by SECARMY in July 1986. This change deleted the words 'unique' and ';national interest'. Only one award was approved prior to the revision and it went to the 3d Battalion, 502d Infantry, 101st Airborne Division. Nearly 200 of the 248 soldiers that were killed in the plane crash in Gander, Newfoundland, were from the battalion and were on their way home in December 1985 from duty with the Multinational Force and Observers in the Sinai Desert. The Army Superior Unit Award is the third highest unit decoration which may be bestowed upon a U.S. Army unit.

    Prerequisites


    The Army Superior Unit Award shall be awarded at peacetime to any Squad or Element which displays outstanding meritorious performance of a difficult and challenging mission carried out under extraordinary circumstances as ordered by the commander.

  17. Bronze Star, BS

    History


    General George C. Marshall, in a memorandum to President Roosevelt dated February 3, 1944, wrote: "The fact that the ground troops, Infantry in particular, lead miserable lives of extreme discomfort and are the ones who must close in personal combat with the enemy, makes the maintenance of their morale of great importance. The award of the Air Medal have had an adverse reaction on the ground troops, particularly the Infantry Riflemen who are now suffering the heaviest losses, air or ground, in the Army, and enduring the greatest hardships." The Air Medal had been adopted two years earlier to raise airmen’s morale. President Roosevelt authorized the Bronze Star Medal by Executive Order 9419 dated 4 February 1944, retroactive to 7 December 1941. This authorization was announced in War Department Bulletin No. 3, dated 10 February 1944. The Executive Order was amended by President Kennedy, per Executive Order 11046 dated 24 August 1962, to expand the authorization to include those serving with friendly forces. As a result of a study conducted in 1947, the policy was implemented that authorized the retroactive award of the Bronze Star Medal to soldiers who had received the Combat Infantryman Badge or the Combat Medical Badge during World War II. The basis for doing this was that the badges were awarded only to soldiers who had borne the hardships which resulted in General Marshall’s support of the Bronze Star Medal. Both badges required a recommendation by the commander and a citation in orders.

    Prerequisites


    A Bronze Star is an award issued for bravery in the face of danger. Specifically, the recipient must perform heroic actions which save the mission, and allow for its continuation.

  18. Silver Star, SS

    History


    The Citation Star was established as a result of an Act of Congress on July 9, 1918 (65th Congress, Sess II, Chapter 143, page 873) and was promulgated in War Department Bulletin No. 43 dated 1918. It was retroactive to include those cited for gallantry in action in previous campaigns back to the Spanish-American War. Per letter from General Jervey, Office of the Chief of Staff, dated February 26, 1926, is quoted in part: The Secretary of War directs as follows - The following is the amended version of paragraph 187 of Army Regulation: 'No more than one Medal of Honor or one Distinguished Service Cross or one Distinguished Service Medal shall be issued to any one person, but for each succeeding or act sufficient to justify the award of a Medal of Honor or Distinguished Service Cross or Distinguished Service Medal, respectively, a bronze oak leaf cluster, shall be issued in lieu thereof; and for each citation of an officer or enlisted man for gallantry in action, published in orders from headquarters of a force commanded by a general officer, not warranting the issue of a Medal of Honor, Distinguished Service Cross or Distinguished Service Medal, he shall wear a silver star, 3/16 inch in diameter, as prescribed in Uniform Regulations.' Army Regulation 600-40, paragraph 48, September 27, 1921, specified that the Citation Star would be worn above the clasp, on the ribbon of the service medal for the campaign for service in which the citations were given. On July 19, 1932, the Secretary of War approved the Silver Star medal to replace the Citation Star. This design placed the Citation Star on a bronze pendant suspended from the ribbon design. The star was no longer attached to a service or campaign ribbon. Authorization for the Silver Star was placed into law by an Act of Congress for the Navy on August 7, 1942 and an Act of Congress for the Army on December 15, 1942. The primary reason for congressional authorization was the desire to award the medal to civilians as well as the Army. The current statutory authorization for the Silver Star Medal is Title 10, United States Code, Section 3746.

    Prerequisites


    The Silver Star is the only valor award which does not have a non valor option. For it to be awarded, a soldier must constantly perform acts of valor and bravery in the battlefield, above and beyond the call of duty. Acts that constantly change the tide of battle, and lead to decisive victories against opposition forces. This is the highest valor award that we can issue in this unit.

  19. Air Assault Badge, AAB

    History


    According to the United States Army Institute of Heraldry, 'The Air Assault Badge was approved by the Chief of Staff, Army, on 18 January 1978, for Army-wide wear by individuals who successfully completed Air Assault training after 1 April 1974. The badge had previously been approved as the Airmobile Badge authorized for local wear by the Commander of the 101st Airborne Division, effective 1 April 1974'. The division had been reorganized from parachute to airmobile in mid-1968 in Vietnam and designated the 101st Airborne Division (Airmobile). The parenthetical designation changed to Air Assault on 4 October 1974 and the name of the badge was likewise changed.

    Prerequisites


    The Air Assault Badge shall be awarded to soldiers who successfully complete Air Assault School. The Air Assault School is a part of Ranger Assessment and Selection Program Phase 2.

  20. Combat Infantryman Badge, CIB

    History


    The Combat Infantryman Badge (CIB) is a United States Army military award. The badge is awarded to infantrymen and Special Forces Soldiers in the rank of Colonel and below, who personally fought in active ground combat while assigned as members of either an infantry, Ranger or Special Forces unit, of brigade size or smaller, any time after 6 December 1941. The CIB and its non-combat contemporary, the Expert Infantryman Badge (EIB) were simultaneously created during World War II to enhance the morale and prestige of service in the infantry. Specifically, it recognizes the inherent sacrifices of all infantrymen, and that, in comparison to all other military occupational specialties, infantrymen face the greatest risk of being wounded or killed in action.

    Prerequisites


    The Combat Infantryman Badge shall be awarded to any soldier who has completed a campaign with a minimum of 70% attendance, no less than one time, and came out victorious.

  21. Combat Infantryman Badge, CIB 2

    History


    The Combat Infantryman Badge (CIB) is a United States Army military award. The badge is awarded to infantrymen and Special Forces Soldiers in the rank of Colonel and below, who personally fought in active ground combat while assigned as members of either an infantry, Ranger or Special Forces unit, of brigade size or smaller, any time after 6 December 1941. The CIB and its non-combat contemporary, the Expert Infantryman Badge (EIB) were simultaneously created during World War II to enhance the morale and prestige of service in the infantry. Specifically, it recognizes the inherent sacrifices of all infantrymen, and that, in comparison to all other military occupational specialties, infantrymen face the greatest risk of being wounded or killed in action.

    Prerequisites


    The Combat Infantryman Badge 2 shall be awarded to any soldier who has participated in active ground combat, no less than two official campaign operations with a minimum of 70% attendance in each, and came out victorious.

  22. Combat Infantryman Badge, CIB 3

    History


    The Combat Infantryman Badge (CIB) is a United States Army military award. The badge is awarded to infantrymen and Special Forces Soldiers in the rank of Colonel and below, who personally fought in active ground combat while assigned as members of either an infantry, Ranger or Special Forces unit, of brigade size or smaller, any time after 6 December 1941. The CIB and its non-combat contemporary, the Expert Infantryman Badge (EIB) were simultaneously created during World War II to enhance the morale and prestige of service in the infantry. Specifically, it recognizes the inherent sacrifices of all infantrymen, and that, in comparison to all other military occupational specialties, infantrymen face the greatest risk of being wounded or killed in action.

    Prerequisites


    The Combat Infantryman Badge 3 shall be awarded to any soldier who has participated in active ground combat, no less than four official campaign operations with a minimum of 70% attendance in each, and came out victorious.

  23. Combat Infantryman Badge, CIB 4

    History


    The Combat Infantryman Badge (CIB) is a United States Army military award. The badge is awarded to infantrymen and Special Forces Soldiers in the rank of Colonel and below, who personally fought in active ground combat while assigned as members of either an infantry, Ranger or Special Forces unit, of brigade size or smaller, any time after 6 December 1941. The CIB and its non-combat contemporary, the Expert Infantryman Badge (EIB) were simultaneously created during World War II to enhance the morale and prestige of service in the infantry. Specifically, it recognizes the inherent sacrifices of all infantrymen, and that, in comparison to all other military occupational specialties, infantrymen face the greatest risk of being wounded or killed in action.

    Prerequisites


    The Combat Infantryman Badge 4 shall be awarded to any soldier who has participated in active ground combat, no less than four official campaign operations with a minimum of 70% attendance in each, and came out victorious.

  24. Expert Field Medical Badge, EFMB

    History


    The Expert Field Medical Badge (EFMB) is a United States Army decoration first created on June 18, 1965. This badge is the non-combat equivalent of the Combat Medical Badge (CMB) and is awarded to medical personnel of the US Military who successfully complete a set of qualification tests including both written and performance portions.

    Prerequisites


    The Expert Field Medical Badge shall be awarded to soldiers who succesfully complete the Expert Field Medical Course inside the 3rd Ranger Battalion.

  25. Combat Medical Badge, CMB

    History


    Originally established as the Medical Badge, the Combat Medical Badge (CMB) was created by the War Department on 1 March 1945. It could be awarded to officers, warrant officers, and enlisted Soldier of the Medical Department assigned or attached to the medical detachment of infantry regiments, infantry battalions, and elements thereof designated as infantry in tables of organization or tables of organization and equipment. Its evolution stemmed from a requirement to recognize medical aid-men who shared the same hazards and hardships of ground combat on a daily basis with the infantry Soldier. Though established almost a year and a half after the Combat Infantry Badge (CIB), it could be awarded retroactively to 7 December 1941 to fully qualified personnel.

    Prerequisites


    The Combat Medical Badge shall be awarded to any member, at the rank of Colonel or below, who is assigned or attached to a medical unit (company or smaller size) which provides medical support to a ground combat arms unit. The individual must be performing medical duties while simultaneously being actively engaged by the enemy.

  26. Ranger Tab

    History


    The Ranger tab is a service school military decoration of the United States Army signifying completion of the 61-day-long Ranger School course in small-unit infantry combat tactics in woodland, mountain, and swamp operations. It is currently one of four permanent individual skill/marksmanship tabs authorized for wear by the U.S. Army. In order of seniority, they are the President's Hundred Tab, the Special Forces Tab, the Ranger Tab, and the Sapper Tab. Only three may be worn at one time.

    Prerequisites


    Awarded to those who pass the Ranger Assessment and Selection Course.

  27. Marksmanship Badge (Marksman)

    History


    A Marksmanship Badge is a military badge of the United States Armed Forces or a U.S. Civilian badge which is presented to personnel upon successful completion of a weapons qualification course (known as Marksmanship Qualification Badges) or high placement in an official marksmanship competition (known as Marksmanship Competition Badges).

    Prerequisites


    Score 23 - 29 hits with the M16A2 Rifle during rifle qualification.

  28. Marksmanship Badge (Sharpshooter)

    History


    A Marksmanship Badge is a military badge of the United States Armed Forces or a U.S. Civilian badge which is presented to personnel upon successful completion of a weapons qualification course (known as Marksmanship Qualification Badges) or high placement in an official marksmanship competition (known as Marksmanship Competition Badges).

    Prerequisites


    Score 30- 35 hits with the M16A2 Rifle during rifle qualification.

  29. Marksmanship Badge (Expert)

    History


    A Marksmanship Badge is a military badge of the United States Armed Forces or a U.S. Civilian badge which is presented to personnel upon successful completion of a weapons qualification course (known as Marksmanship Qualification Badges) or high placement in an official marksmanship competition (known as Marksmanship Competition Badges).

    Prerequisites


    Score 36 - 40 hits with the M16A2 Rifle during rifle qualification.

  30. Basic Parachute Badge

    History


    The Parachutist Badge, also commonly referred to as 'Jump Wings' is a military badge of the United States Armed Forces awarded to members of the United States Army, Air Force, Marine Corps and Navy.

    Prerequisites


    The Basic Parachute Badge shall be awarded to soldiers who have successfully complete Airborne School.

  31. Senior Parachutist Badge

    History


    The original Army Parachutist Badge was designed in 1941 by Captain (later Lieutenant General) William P. Yarborough and approved by the Department of the Army in March of that year. The Parachutist Badge replaced the 'Parachutist Patch' which had previously worn as a large patch on the side of a paratrooper's garrison cap. LTG Yarborough also designed the Senior and Master Parachutist Badges and the addition of stars to portray the number of combat jumps.

    Prerequisites


    Complete Jump Master School. Must have 5 training jump schools completed to attend.

    Complete 10 successful jumps between official Operations and Airborne School(s).

  32. Master Parachutist Badge

    History


    The original Army Parachutist Badge was designed in 1941 by Captain (later Lieutenant General) William P. Yarborough and approved by the Department of the Army in March of that year. The Parachutist Badge replaced the 'Parachutist Patch' which had previously worn as a large patch on the side of a paratrooper's garrison cap. LTG Yarborough also designed the Senior and Master Parachutist Badges and the addition of stars to portray the number of combat jumps.

    Prerequisites


    Complete Jump Master Schoo Must have 5 training jump schools completed to attend.

    Complete 20 successful jumps between Official operations and Airborne School(s).

  33. Basic Parachute Badge, 1

    History


    The Parachutist Badge, also commonly referred to as 'Jump Wings' is a military badge of the United States Armed Forces awarded to members of the United States Army, Air Force, Marine Corps and Navy.

    Prerequisites


    The Basic Parachute Badge 1 shall be awarded to soldiers who have successfully completed no less than 1 combat jump during an official operations.

  34. Basic Parachute Badge, 2

    History


    The Parachutist Badge, also commonly referred to as 'Jump Wings' is a military badge of the United States Armed Forces awarded to members of the United States Army, Air Force, Marine Corps and Navy.

    Prerequisites


    The Basic Parachute Badge 2 shall be awarded to soldiers who have successfully completed no less than 2 combat jump during an official operations.

  35. Basic Parachute Badge, 3

    History


    The Parachutist Badge, also commonly referred to as 'Jump Wings' is a military badge of the United States Armed Forces awarded to members of the United States Army, Air Force, Marine Corps and Navy.

    Prerequisites


    The Basic Parachute Badge 3 shall be awarded to soldiers who have successfully completed no less than 3 combat jumps during an official operations.

  36. Basic Parachute Badge, 4

    History


    The Parachutist Badge, also commonly referred to as 'Jump Wings' is a military badge of the United States Armed Forces awarded to members of the United States Army, Air Force, Marine Corps and Navy.

    Prerequisites


    The Basic Parachute Badge 4 shall be awarded to soldiers who have successfully completed no less than 4 combat jumps during an official operations.

  37. Basic Parachute Badge, 5

    History


    The Parachutist Badge, also commonly referred to as 'Jump Wings' is a military badge of the United States Armed Forces awarded to members of the United States Army, Air Force, Marine Corps and Navy.

    Prerequisites


    The Basic Parachute Badge 4 shall be awarded to soldiers who have successfully completed no less than 5 combat jumps during an official operations.

  38. Appurtenance - Numerals

    Description


    Numerals are attached and worn on the Operational Leadership Ribbon (NCO Development Ribbon IRL) to indicate completion of additional leadership training.

    Numeral 2 is awarded upon completion of Advanced Operational Leadership Course.

    Numeral 3 is awarded upon completion of Drill Instructor School.

  39. Appurtenance - Bronze V

    Description


    Awarded at discretion of Battalion or Company Commander for Heroism or Valor in combat during an official operation mission. May be worn when awarded in conjunction with the following medals and ribbons: Bronze Star, Joint Service Commendation Medal, Army Commendation Medal, any other other award at command discretion.

  40. Appurtenance - Oak Leaf Clusters

    Description


    The bronze Oak Leaf Cluster is awarded to and worn by Army personnel on US decorations to denote the second and subsequent awards. A silver Oak Leaf Cluster is worn in lieu of five (5) bronze clusters. Oak Leaf Clusters are also worn on unit citations for the same purpose.', 'May be worn upon the following awards: Distinguished Service Cross, Defense Distinguished Service Medal, Silver Star, Bronze Star, Purple Heart, Meritorious Service Medal, Joint Service commendation Medal, Army Commendation Medal, Joint Service Achievement Medal, Army Achievement Medal.

    May also be worn upon the following Unit Citations: Valorous Unit Award, and Army Superior Unit Award.

  41. Appurtenance - Service Stars

    Description


    A five-pointed bronze star is worn on service ribbons to denote subsequent awards. A Silver Service Star is worn in lieu of five bronze stars.', 'Service stars may be worn upon the following awards: Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal, Global War on Terrorism Expeditionary Medal, Global War on Terrorism Service Medal, Armed Forces Service Medal, Humanitarian Service Medal, Military Outstanding Volunteer Service Medal.

  42. Appurtenance - Arrowhead

    Description


    A bronze replica of an Indian arrowhead 1/4-inch tall. It denotes participation in a combat parachute jump or air assault insertion via helicopter during an official operation. May be worn upon the Operation Ribbon in which the Airborne or Air Assault mission was completed.

  43. Appurtencance - Clasps

    Description


    Subsequent Awards of the Good Conduct Medal are represented by a clasp with knots placed on the medal or ribbon. Bronze clasps indicate the second (two loops) through fifth award (five loops); silver clasps indicate sixth (one loop) through tenth award (five loops); and gold clasps indicate eleventh (one loop) through the fifteenth award (5 loops).

    Second, fifth, sixth, and tenth award are pictured.

  44. Operation Forlorn Hope Service Ribbon

    Description


    Operation Forlorn Hope was a combat operation during July through September 2018.

    Operation Forlorn Hope Service Ribbon shall be awarded to soldiers who served in Operation Forlorn Hope for a minimum of (10) combat missions.

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